Who We Are

Our Vision

A society in which every person is free from the threat and trauma of child sex trafficking.

Our Mission

We implement education and prevention strategies and provide clinical and support services to survivors of child sex trafficking.

Our Values

Araminta reduces the threat of child sex trafficking—the buying and selling of minors for the purpose of sexual exploitation—and provides clinical and support services to individuals who have survived what the U.S. Department of Justice and United Nations define as modern slavery.

A child can never be responsible for, or complicit in, their own abuse.

A member of the Maryland Human Trafficking Task Force and Baltimore City Human Trafficking Collaborative, we spotlight a danger that many people know little about, while working with local communities to develop and implement prevention strategies based on specific risk factors. We also tailor counseling and health care to the needs of individual survivors, whether children or adults, and provide life skills, resources, and mentorship they use to rebuild their lives.

Children in Maryland are exceptionally vulnerable to trafficking. Individual vulnerabilities include housing instability and homelessness, domestic violence, sexual abuse, low self-esteem, social isolation, and untreated mental health or substance abuse in the family. Children in the child welfare system, including foster care, are disproportionately at risk.

In Maryland, these factors are compounded by the state’s disparity of extreme poverty and extreme wealth, along with the increased presence of gambling facilities. The intersection of a major seaport, international airports and interstate highways used to transport children within and without Maryland further foster an illicit marketplace for children.

We take both our name and inspiration from Harriet Tubman, the American abolitionist and political activist, whose birth name was Araminta. Born enslaved in Maryland, Ms. Tubman led family members and other enslaved people to freedom as a “conductor” of the Underground Railroad, guiding them to places where they could build new lives. Since “conductors” and “passengers” traveled at night to avoid capture, the Underground Railroad used lanterns as beacons of safety and freedom.

Board of Directors

  • Luke Zipp

    President & Treasurer

  • Beth McDonald

    Vice President

  • Rev. Bill Humphrey

    Director

  • John Ingham

    Director

  • Ja’Ara McCoy

    Director

  • Stephanie Merkert

    Director

  • Jonathan Porter

    Director

  • Vickie Rekart

    Secretary

  • Patrice Sowah

    Director

Senior Leadership

Left to right: Iona Rudisill, LMSW, Clinical Director of Survivor Services; Rhonda Sanco, Executive Director and CEO; Beth Luthye, Director of Program Strategy and Development; Renee Murrell, Ph.D., LMSW, Director of Community Engagement; Candace Parrott, Human Resources Consultant

Harriet Tubman

1822 – 1913

Harriet Tubman was born into slavery as Araminta Ross in 1822 in Maryland. When she was 5 years old, she was subjected to a life of abuse and exploitation.

In 1844, Araminta married John Tubman and subsequently changed her name to Harriet. In 1849, at age 27, she escaped from Maryland to Philadelphia. Shortly thereafter, Ms. Tubman became an active “conductor” on the Underground Railroad, leading others to freedom and helping them find food, shelter, and even jobs in the North.

The Underground was an intricate network of routes and safe houses. Since houses were often 10 to 20 miles apart—and “conductors” and “passengers” traveled at night to avoid capture—lanterns were placed in their windows as beacons of safety and freedom.

By 1860, Ms. Tubman had made the perilous trip back to Maryland more than a dozen times, including one especially challenging journey in which she rescued her elderly parents.

As an abolitionist, Ms. Tubman fought to end the system of slavery in the United States. As a political activist, she pushed for the rights of black Americans, women, and others who were marginalized. Until the end of her life, Tubman advocated for educational and economic opportunities for people who had experienced slavery, enabling them to improve their lives.

In a letter to Ms. Tubman, famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass wrote, “Excepting John Brown—of sacred memory—I know of no one who has willingly encountered more perils and hardships to serve our enslaved people than you have.” John Brown himself once called Tubman “one of the bravest persons on this continent.”

Join the Support Community

Join the Support Community

Araminta Freedom Initiative
PO Box 22106
Baltimore, MD 21203

Copyright ©2022 Araminta.

Araminta is a 501(c)3 organization, contributions to which are eligible for tax-deductible treatment for federal and state income tax purposes.
Contributions are designated to the overall mission of Araminta and will be used to meet the organization’s most urgent need unless otherwise specified.

You may request a fair and full description of the mission and activities of the organization, as well as a copy of our financial statements at contact@aramintafreedom.org.

Araminta Freedom Initiative
PO Box 22106
Baltimore, MD 21203

Copyright ©2022 Araminta.

Araminta is a 501(c)3 organization, contributions to which are eligible for tax-deductible treatment for federal and state income tax purposes.
Contributions are designated to the overall mission of Araminta and will be used to meet the organization’s most urgent need unless otherwise specified.

You may request a fair and full description of the mission and activities of the organization, as well as a copy of our financial statements at contact@aramintafreedom.org.